All Posts in Coins & Currency

by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
2019 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin

The U.S. Mint started accepting orders for the 2019 American Liberty High Relief Gold Coin on the 15th of August, which is one of their newest releases.  This coin is highly anticipated by many collectors as it has a number of characteristics which are desirable.

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by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
James Monroe Presidential Coin

2019 marks the release of the James Monroe Presidential Silver Coin, a product which is sought after numerous collectors. It is struck in honor of James Monroe, who was the fifth president of the United States. It is part of the Presidential Series of coins which also includes John Adams, James Madison and George Washington.

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by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
1922 10 Gold Certificate

The USA first begin issuing gold certificates during the outbreak of the Civil War in the 1860s. However, no certificates with a $10 dollar denomination were introduced until 1907. The 1922 version is especially sought after by collectors since it marks the final large sized certificate that was ever printed. By the late 1920s American currency was reduced to the size most are familiar with today.

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by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
Star Note

There are a number of things to take into consideration when determining the value of a star note, the most important of which are age, condition, the total amount of notes that were printed for a given denomination, and the print run size.

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by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
Series of 1928 Bill

The 1928 $1000 bill is sought after by collectors, and its value will be determined by factors such as the district of issue, the star note, serial number, color of the seal and condition. Originally about 1,105,008 notes were printed in 1928, as of today it is estimated that less than 70,000 remain.

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by: Ben Tseytlin - on Coins & Currency
currency collectors

In recent years, restrictions have increased on cash transactions, especially in developed nations. Those who fly frequently know that many airlines no longer accept cash to purchase snacks and beverages during flights, and some stadiums in the U.S. have enacted similar policies. In Europe, countries like France, Spain and Sweden have banned cash transactions above a certain amount, requiring citizens to use electronic payments instead. While such measures won’t affect currency collectors much in the short term, the long term ramifications of such policies should be a cause for concern.

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